Leave the Chef Alone.

I drive up and down the NYS I-87 almost daily.  As a result of a trend I’ve noticed I have made up a new drinking game.  The speed limit is 65, I go 75, certainly not the fastest guy on the three lane highway.  I stick to the middle lane and pass on the left as needed.  So, here’s the game:  When you pass a Toyota Prius that’s going 55 in the middle lane take a shot.  When a Prius is being passed by someone in both the left and right lanes simultaneously take two shots.  You’re sure to be loaded by the end of most trips.

I do not advocate drinking while driving.  If you’re one of the slower drivers on a highway and you very rarely pass anyone, STAY IN THE RIGHT LANE and leave me alone in the center lane.

Last week was Restaurant Week in Schenectady.  It sucked.  We were completely booked up for the five days that we were open, we went through far more bread per person than normal, the FOH was short-staffed, and there were several very new members of the service team.  Pretty much everyone did a great job, worked hard and we got through it alive.

The last order of the week:  Server comes into the kitchen clearly looking for something in the pass.  As we’re well into our clean up, with all the food wrapped and stored I looked over to the young man.  “Whatcha need?”  “I’m looking for table 33, Two beef, a chicken and a cassoulet.”  I hung my head because I knew I was about to add about a half hour to my very long week.  The order had come in earlier on a ticket that started with a series of voids, so it was overlooked.  Why it came in on a void ticket is beyond me.  I can tell you this, don’t put a very new employee on the floor as a server when it’s busy if you can avoid it.

Keep an eye on The Duck.

I sometimes understand the guy that goes out for a pack of cigarettes and never comes back.

Sunday morning I went out for light bulbs, I returned home right after.  It’s home and I like it there.

I was strongly encouraged to attend a birthday party for a 5-year-old at a bowling alley on Sunday.  Not that I don’t like the folks who were hosting the party, quite the contrary, but I was planning to be home during the party taking a nap. It was one of those things you look forward to during an especially difficult week.  I was impressed with a young lady named Gabby, the Bowling Alley employee that was running the party.  She was on point, entertained the kids. helped them bowl and kept everything moving on a tight schedule.  I’ve seen restaurant professionals that couldn’t keep a function on schedule to save their lives.  I still would rather have been left home alone but it was fun to see Gabby at work, shaming many of the people I’ve worked with in the past.

There is a clear and remarkable difference between a professional and a hobbyist.

Sometimes my day consists of constant questions.

Sometimes I just want to be left alone, even if there are people around.  Sometimes I don’t want anyone around. Mostly I like most of the people around me.

 

 

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2 thoughts on “Leave the Chef Alone.

  1. “I was strongly encouraged to attend a birthday party for a 5-year-old at a bowling alley on Sunday.”

    Bad pizza.

    “There is a clear and remarkable difference between a professional and a hobbyist.”

    Not necessarily the quality of the work, but how long it takes to get it done.

    Like

  2. Pingback: Let Me Give You Some Advice | chefsday

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