Hot for Teacher

Teaching, I mean really teaching someone to cook is a very difficult task.  If they do not have a genuine interest in food and how it should taste there’s no chance they’ll learn.

There are three types of cooks that I’ve trained over the years.  First, and my favorite, is the cook who knows he/she doesn’t know everything and will listen to what you tell them and pay attention to what you show them. They also pay attention when you’re not showing them something.  They learn to understand why you do things a particular way and embrace proper technique.  They also seek information and ideas outside of work and generally end up as chefs.  Second is common, tolerable, and often necessary due to a shallow labor pool.  The cook who pays attention and tries within the work environment to mimic my techniques and present the plates as I would.  They do their job well and have a clear understanding in the professional kitchen.  The third kind of cook has little interest in the food, and is simply there because they started as a dishwasher and moved to the cold station after a while. They’ve been cooking in sub-par in kitchens most of their working days, and see no reason to learn anything new.  They also don’t understand why I’m such an advocate of proper cooking technique, and a clean and organized work environment as the foundation of a quality kitchen.  These guys are a bad seed in the kitchen and will bring the whole group down with their poor attitude and lack of desire to learn.  They are what sports bars were created for.

Some guys have a bigger mise en place than others.

I was going to write something witty here, but I forgot what it was, I should have written it down.

Gray Kunz is in Saratoga. Most people have no idea what that means.

Many years ago I bought a new text-book, The Elements of Taste by Gray Kunz and Peter Kaminsky. If you buy cookbooks for recipes, then this is not the book for you.  If you buy it because you are learning to cook then I recommend you get a copy.

“The accomplished chef understands how taste works, what its components are, how it can be layered, how it must be balanced, and so on.” – Gray Kunz

Typically you get what you pay for.

Really? Dominic the Italian is turning French?  No, not a chance.  I have however been leaning far to the French with my cooking thoughts

“Above all, keep it simple.” – Auguste Escoffier

I watched a very good movie a few nights ago, Haute Cuisine. It reminded me once again of having very tight standards as being a very important part of being a great cook.  It will require you to read subtitles, so if you’re not bright, you’ll have to miss it.

“If you’re afraid of butter, use cream.” – Julia Child

“You don’t have to cook fancy or complicated masterpieces – just good food from fresh ingredients.”  Also Julia

One of my early teachers, even before I worked in a professional kitchen was Mario Batali. I used to record his Food Network show Molto Mario and then make the things he made.  I wouldn’t follow his recipes, but I would follow his technique.  He explained how to sauté, how to braise, how to make a proper vinaigrette and so on.  He made me understand that once technique was mastered, the ingredients can be switched in and out to create your own versions of a recipe, or to create your own recipes.

 

I was at Hannaford yesterday waiting to buy some cod loins. The woman ahead of me asked for about 12 ounces of salmon fillet without any of that flappy stuff.  After the fish guy trimmed off the tasty belly and put the fillet on the scale he reported that it was “about three-quarters of a pound.”  She replied “I don’t know what that is.”  I turned to her as If I Only Had a Brain played in my head and said he’s spot on, that’s your 12 ounces.  Her reply was “are you sure?”  “Yes, I’m sure, I wasn’t absent the day they covered basic math.”

While I have picked up a great deal of cooking knowledge from people I’ve worked with, I’m for the most part a self-taught.  The bottom line is that you can learn if you want to.  Also, there’s nothing wrong not wanting to learn to cook. Of course, not wanting to learn ensures that you’ll not have a place in a kitchen I run.

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