Hitting The Links

I’m often looking at the facepage or skimming through the interwebs when I have a few spare minutes here or there. When I see and interesting story I save the link so I can go back and read it when I have some time.

I just noticed that I have a bunch of them built up and it’s time to either read them or dump them. I would like to share some of them with you along with my thoughts, that way I can make a blog post with some substance without doing too much work and hopefully you’ll get to read some decent writing for a change.

http://www.newyorkupstate.com/food/2015/05/upstate_ny_food_we_all_love.html#0  I checked this out because I was just asked to participate in an article speculating what an Upstate New York menu would look like with reference made to the origins of California Cuisine, which Jeremiah Tower is given credit for.  My first draft was based in this link, and it was a bit of a mockery of a trend of chefs doing “twists” on things like Buffalo chicken wings by using a different protein instead. Or, trying to do an upscale hot dog by using a Kobe beef hot dog with local onions, and “hand-stirred” mustard.  It’s a hot dog, and there’s nothing upscale about it.  The menu Chef Tower presented at Chez Panisse in October 1976 was simple, and based on the best of local foods.  So, I rewrote my menu with some fine local and regional products and submitted it.

http://openforbusiness.opentable.com/tips/why-this-chef-is-opening-a-restaurant-with-no-servers/  This is likely the only way to get all of your servers to have an interest in the food.  Some do, most do not. Trying to teach them the menu is like trying to teach me about soccer. I get that it’s a sport, but I have no desire to really learn about it. Therefore, I should not be hired by ESPN to be an analyst for soccer. Hire a soccer player. This scenario also eliminates the perpetual rift between the front and the back of the house that occurs all to often. Go team!

https://www.facebook.com/buzzfeedmatt/videos/967271236667087/  If you haven’t been watching this guy, then you should start.

http://time.com/3990350/restaurants-us-chefs/   This is spot on.  The problem of too many restaurants is seen in Saratoga.  This makes the labor pool very thin, and there’s little to choose from when hiring good cooks.  The other problem is that young cooks, fresh out of culinary school feel like they’re ready to run kitchens, leading to a lot of mediocre restaurants.  The mediocrity is not necessarily a result of these young chefs not being skilled, but it’s more as a result of not being experienced and well-rounded enough yet to produce top-notch food on a consistent basis. Keep in mind, there are always exceptions.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/dining/ct-food-restaurant-cooks-shortage-20150803-htmlstory.html  Same thing.

http://airows.com/travel/23-brilliant-life-lessons-from-anthony-bourdain   Read these, pretty much all of them make sense.  I wish I had gotten some of this advice when I was much younger.  I should have traveled and learned more. Shit, by the time I became a professional cook I was 36 years old. I did work in a kitchen when I was 18 and I hated it. I wish I didn’t hate it. I wish someone had just helped me find my way into another kitchen.

Well, I’ve caught up on some reading, and I’m pleased that I could share it with you folks that read this blog. Perry Mason just ended, the night watchman did it which I already knew having seen this episode before. So, I’m going to bed, and looking forward to tomorrow night’s special.  Seared scallops/butternut squash risotto/grilled romaine/apples.

Good night,

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